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Skin Cancer

Have you had your skin checked?

If moles or strange patches of skin are causing concern of the ‘could this be cancer?’ variety, the first thing to do is to stay calm and get in touch. It’s true that New Zealand and Australia have particularly high incidences of skin cancer – but this also means that our specialists are extremely experienced and are training in some of the most effective procedures.


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If moles or strange patches of skin are causing concern of the ‘could this be cancer?’ variety, the first thing to do is to stay calm and get in touch. It’s true that New Zealand and Australia have particularly high incidences of skin cancer – but this also means that our specialists are extremely experienced and are training in some of the most effective procedures.


The skin experts can help

You may have new moles that have appeared after extensive sun exposure, or a pre-existing mole may have changed in shape, colour or size – or you may have been diagnosed with a skin cancer. Here we help you understand the most common concerns relating to skin cancer and point you in the right direction for treatment – and future prevention.

 

 

 

 

Start with prevention

We all know New Zealand’s sun isn’t the easiest on the skin – that’s why our skin cancer rate is among the highest in the world. The blazing sunshine and hole in the ozone layer over New Zealand leads to thousands of people each year suffering from melanoma, basal cell carcinoma, or squamous cell carcinoma. Protect your skin in advance to save yourself a lot of worry and prevent yourself from becoming another skin cancer statistic.

Skin cancer is prevalent

We’ve treated over 20,000 patients with skin cancer over the last ten years, so we know just how common skin cancer is. If you do find yourself with a form of skin cancer, you’re definitely not alone! No matter when you’re affected, our team of skin cancer specialists will provide you with expert care – your partner along the way to skin health.

All types of treatment

Not everyone has the same type of skin cancer, so it follows that not everyone needs the same treatment. At Skin Institute, you’ll find both simple and advanced skin cancer treatment and management, with specialty surgeries for prominent areas like the face. No matter how advanced your skin cancer, we’ve got a treatment to suit.

We’ve treated over 20,000 patients with skin cancer over the last ten years, so we know just how common skin cancer is

Regular check-ups

Early detection is essential. Everyone should check their moles regularly and see a medical professional if they have a mole or lesion that looks suspicious. Regular full body skin checks are also advised.

Risk Factors

In New Zealand everyone is at risk and anyone spending time outdoors at any time in the day should take precautions. It is a myth that you cannot burn on a cloudy day, as water vapour provides no protection from harmful UV rays. Those with lighter skin are more likely to burn, but those with the following should be especially careful in the sun. People with the following should take extra precautions.

 

 

Causes

Appearance

  • Have lots of moles, irregular moles, or large moles.
  • Have freckles and burn before tanning.
  • Have fair skin or blond, red, or light brown hair.

Family History

  • Were previously treated for skin cancer.
  • Have a family history of skin cancer, especially melanoma.

Occupation

  • Spend a lot of time outdoors.
  • Work indoors all week and then get a tan on weekends.

Medical History

  • Have certain autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus).
  • Have had an organ transplant.
  • Take medicines that lower immunity.
  • Take oral contraceptives.
  • Take tetracycline, sulfa drugs or certain other antibiotics.
  • Take naproxen sodium or certain other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
  • Take phenothiazines (major tranquilizers and anti-nausea drugs).
  • Take tricyclic antidepressants.
  • Take thiazide diuretics (medicines used for high blood pressure and some
  • heart conditions).
  • Take sulfonylureas (a form of oral anti-diabetic medication).

Early detection is essential. Everyone should check their moles regularly and see a medical professional if they have a mole or lesion that looks suspicious. Regular full body skin checks are also advised.

  • Trusted

    Established in 1994, Skin Institute has over twenty-nine years of experience in skin care.
  • Multi-disciplinary

    One place for all skin cancer, veins, dermatology & appearance medicine needs.
  • Leading Edge

    We pride ourselves on keeping at the forefront of developments in skin.
  • Nationwide

    Our expert teams are helping Kiwis across the country show the world their best face.
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At Skin Institute our motto is "safe hands". We provide personalised health care that is of the highest of standard in a safe and caring environment, which is something we are very proud of.